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Insurance Estimator Job Description

Automotive Collision Estimate Writer: Salary, Duties and Requirements

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become an automotive collision estimate writer. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details about training, job duties and certification to find out if this is the career for you.

Automotive collision estimate writers typically work for repair shops, and most employers require training in estimating, either through a certificate or degree program. Optional professional certification is available in this field.

Essential Information

An automotive collision estimate writer works for a body shop providing repair cost estimates. Job duties include inspecting damaged vehicles, writing estimate reports and submitting reports to insurance companies. An estimate writer needs training in automotive repair and damage estimating, though work experience in an auto repair shop may substitute for some formal training. These estimators may also wish to receive certification.

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics **PayScale.com

Automotive Collision Estimate Writer Salary

An automotive collision estimate writer may work for private or large corporate repair shops. According to PayScale.com, the median salary for an automobile estimator was $46,430 in 2016.

Automotive Collision Estimate Writer Duties

An automotive collision estimate writer inspects vehicles that have been damaged and creates an estimate of the necessary repairs. An estimate writer follows guidelines that determine the extent of damages as well as what should be charged for repair work. A typical work day for an estimate writer includes inspecting damaged vehicles, consulting guide books for repair costs and creating estimation documents.

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Auctioneering
  • Business Marketing Operations
  • Fashion Merchandising
  • Hospitality Marketing Operations
  • Insurance, General
  • Marketing for Apparel and Accessories
  • Marketing for Travel and Tourism Operations
  • Modeling
  • Real Estate Sales, Appraisal, and Finance
  • Special Product Marketing
  • Tourism Promotion Operations
  • Vehicle and Vehicle Parts Marketing

Automotive Collision Estimate Writer Requirements

Writing estimates is a very detailed and precise process, so employers generally require a person to have training in assessing damage and automotive repair. Training and education options may include degree or certificate programs in collision damage assessment, collision repair estimating or auto collision repair.

A program covering collision damage assessment or estimation may offer instruction in appraising damages technology, using estimating manuals or guides, training in hands-on repair, estimating damage on heavy trucks and repairing alignment and structural issues. It may also include courses in shop safety, vehicle identification, estimating terminology and computer estimating. A diploma or associate degree in auto collision repair may offer a student direct training in repair work, along with instruction in how to estimate the cost of repairs.

Automotive collision estimate writers may also wish to be certified through the National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence (ASE). The ASE offers a damage analysis and estimating certification. This certification offers recognition for estimators that possess exceptional skills and knowledge in the area of collision estimating. To earn this ASE certification a person must pass the required exam and show proof of two years of work experience in the industry.

An automotive collision estimate writer inspects damaged vehicles and makes a detailed assessment of estimated repair costs. Most employers require formal training, which may include postsecondary programs in estimating and repair. Job opportunities in this field are predicted to decline over the 2014-2024 decade.

Project Estimator: Job Description, Duties and Requirements

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a cost estimator. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details about education and job duties to find out if this is the career for you.

You may consider a career as a project estimator if you have a strong background in mathematics and are comfortable working in a deadline-driven environment. Project estimators can work in the construction or manufacturing sectors, and be required to visit field sites or be primarily office-based. A bachelor’s degree is often the minimum requirement, but becoming certified may further help with job prospects.

Essential Information

The project estimator, also known as the cost estimator, serves a vital function in the growth of a construction or manufacturing company. This professional is responsible for accurately calculating the total costs associated with a construction project or the development of a new product. A project estimator may also review bids offered by subcontractors in order to choose the most cost effective option.

Sources: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Career Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the number of jobs for cost estimators is anticipated to rise 9% between 2014 and 2024, which is faster than average. The BLS also reported in 2015 that the median yearly salary for a cost estimator was $60,390.

Job Duties

The daily duties of a project estimator vary considerably depending on the type of firm and the size of the project. According to the BLS, the vast majority of project estimators work in either the construction or manufacturing industries.

Construction Project Estimator

A cost estimator for a construction company assesses the potential development site for its appropriateness for building, checking for variables like plumbing and electrical availability. The next step is to determine the order of operations for expediency and identify the kinds and amounts of materials required.

All of these duties entail visits to potential construction sites, supply warehouses and service-oriented businesses. The project estimator takes measurements, records data and estimates the quantity of materials needed, and finally, using complex mathematical formulas, determines the final cost of development.

Manufacturing Project Estimator

The estimating professional who develops cost information for a manufacturing company will spend the majority of the workday preparing data associated with either producing a new product or improving the design of an existing product.

Involvement with vendors is also key, and the estimator may spend time visiting various subcontractors and negotiating with service professionals and suppliers. After careful calculations, the estimator will then forecast the production costs within a given timetable.

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Actuarial Sciences
  • Business and Commerce, General
  • Business Statistics
  • Customer Service Management
  • eCommerce
  • Logistics, Distribution, and Materials Management
  • Management Science
  • Office Management
  • Operations Management
  • Public and Nonprofit Organizational Management
  • Purchases, Acquisitions, and Contracts Management
  • Transportation Management

Job Requirements

Educational Preparation

While there is no specific degree in cost estimation, a bachelor’s degree is usually required by employers. Aspiring project estimators who wish to work in the construction industry would be well-served by a bachelor’s degree in construction science, construction management or building science. These 4-year programs, aside from general course curriculum, instruct students on structural systems, project planning, surveying systems and construction methodology.

On the other hand, prospective project estimators who would like to work in manufacturing usually pursue degrees in mathematics, engineering or statistics. Also 4-year programs, these degree programs focus much more heavily on mathematics and its practical application in business. Core courses may include statistics, variable analysis, linear algebra and probability theory.

Professional Certification

Though not a requirement for practice, industry certification is available and may be viewed positively by employers. The Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering (AACE) offers six levels of credentialing, all based on professional experience and a written examination. The American Society of Professional Estimators (ASPE) is more geared towards manufacturing estimation, and offers the Certified Professional Estimator (CPE) designation to interested applicants.

Helpful Skills

Prospective project estimators must be adept in mathematics. They should also have keen analytical skills. These professionals must be able to manage the high stress of tight deadlines and the major responsibility of accurately forecasting the budget for a project.

To recap, prospective project estimators should first earn a bachelor’s degree related to construction management or mathematics, depending on the industry in which they would like to work. Certifications exist as well, which prove the competencies gained from a combination of formal education and work experience. Once established, project estimators are responsible for assessing a building site or manufacturing process to determine the cost of development.

Cost Estimators

What Cost Estimators Do

Cost estimators collect and analyze data in order to estimate the time, money, materials, and labor required to manufacture a product, construct a building, or provide a service. They generally specialize in a particular product or industry.

Work Environment

Cost estimators work mostly in offices, and some estimators also visit construction sites and factory assembly lines. Most work full time.

How to Become a Cost Estimator

Most cost estimators need a bachelor’s degree, although some workers with several years of experience in construction may qualify without a bachelor’s degree.

The median annual wage for cost estimators was $63,110 in May 2017.

Job Outlook

Employment of cost estimators is projected to grow 11 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Overall job opportunities should be good because companies require accurate cost estimates in order to operate profitably.

State & Area Data

Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for cost estimators.

Similar Occupations

Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of cost estimators with similar occupations.

More Information, Including Links to O*NET

Learn more about cost estimators by visiting additional resources, including O*NET, a source on key characteristics of workers and occupations.

What Cost Estimators Do About this section

Cost estimators collect and analyze data in order to estimate the time, money, materials, and labor required to manufacture a product, construct a building, or provide a service. They generally specialize in a particular product or industry.

Cost estimators typically do the following:

  • Identify factors affecting costs, such as production time, materials, and labor
  • Read blueprints and technical documents in order to prepare estimates
  • Collaborate with engineers, architects, clients, and contractors
  • Calculate, analyze, and adjust estimates
  • Recommend ways to reduce costs
  • Work with sales teams to prepare estimates and bids for clients
  • Maintain records of estimated and actual costs

Accurately estimating the costs of construction and manufacturing projects is vital to the survival of businesses. Cost estimators provide managers with the information they need in order to submit competitive contract bids or price products appropriately.

Estimators analyze production processes to determine how much time, money, and labor a project needs. Their estimates account for many factors, including allowances for wasted material, bad weather, shipping delays, and other variables that can increase costs and lower profits.

In building construction, cost estimators use software to simulate the construction process and evaluate the costs of design choices. They often consult databases and their own records to compare the costs of similar projects.

The following are examples of types of cost estimators:

Construction cost estimators prepare estimates for buildings, roads, and other construction projects. They may calculate the total cost of building a bridge or commercial shopping center, or they may calculate the cost of just one component, such as the foundation. They identify costs of elements such as raw materials and labor, and they may set a timeline for how long they expect the project to take. Although many work directly for construction firms, some work for contractors and engineering firms.

Manufacturing cost estimators calculate the costs of developing, producing, or redesigning a company’s goods or services. For example, a cost estimator working for a home appliance manufacturer may determine a new dishwasher’s production costs, allowing managers to make production decisions.

Other workers, such as operations research analysts and construction managers, may also estimate costs in the course of their usual duties.

Project Estimator: Job Description, Duties and Requirements

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a cost estimator. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details about education and job duties to find out if this is the career for you.

You may consider a career as a project estimator if you have a strong background in mathematics and are comfortable working in a deadline-driven environment. Project estimators can work in the construction or manufacturing sectors, and be required to visit field sites or be primarily office-based. A bachelor’s degree is often the minimum requirement, but becoming certified may further help with job prospects.

Essential Information

The project estimator, also known as the cost estimator, serves a vital function in the growth of a construction or manufacturing company. This professional is responsible for accurately calculating the total costs associated with a construction project or the development of a new product. A project estimator may also review bids offered by subcontractors in order to choose the most cost effective option.

Sources: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Career Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the number of jobs for cost estimators is anticipated to rise 9% between 2014 and 2024, which is faster than average. The BLS also reported in 2015 that the median yearly salary for a cost estimator was $60,390.

Job Duties

The daily duties of a project estimator vary considerably depending on the type of firm and the size of the project. According to the BLS, the vast majority of project estimators work in either the construction or manufacturing industries.

Construction Project Estimator

A cost estimator for a construction company assesses the potential development site for its appropriateness for building, checking for variables like plumbing and electrical availability. The next step is to determine the order of operations for expediency and identify the kinds and amounts of materials required.

All of these duties entail visits to potential construction sites, supply warehouses and service-oriented businesses. The project estimator takes measurements, records data and estimates the quantity of materials needed, and finally, using complex mathematical formulas, determines the final cost of development.

Manufacturing Project Estimator

The estimating professional who develops cost information for a manufacturing company will spend the majority of the workday preparing data associated with either producing a new product or improving the design of an existing product.

Involvement with vendors is also key, and the estimator may spend time visiting various subcontractors and negotiating with service professionals and suppliers. After careful calculations, the estimator will then forecast the production costs within a given timetable.

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Actuarial Sciences
  • Business and Commerce, General
  • Business Statistics
  • Customer Service Management
  • eCommerce
  • Logistics, Distribution, and Materials Management
  • Management Science
  • Office Management
  • Operations Management
  • Public and Nonprofit Organizational Management
  • Purchases, Acquisitions, and Contracts Management
  • Transportation Management

Job Requirements

Educational Preparation

While there is no specific degree in cost estimation, a bachelor’s degree is usually required by employers. Aspiring project estimators who wish to work in the construction industry would be well-served by a bachelor’s degree in construction science, construction management or building science. These 4-year programs, aside from general course curriculum, instruct students on structural systems, project planning, surveying systems and construction methodology.

On the other hand, prospective project estimators who would like to work in manufacturing usually pursue degrees in mathematics, engineering or statistics. Also 4-year programs, these degree programs focus much more heavily on mathematics and its practical application in business. Core courses may include statistics, variable analysis, linear algebra and probability theory.

Professional Certification

Though not a requirement for practice, industry certification is available and may be viewed positively by employers. The Association for the Advancement of Cost Engineering (AACE) offers six levels of credentialing, all based on professional experience and a written examination. The American Society of Professional Estimators (ASPE) is more geared towards manufacturing estimation, and offers the Certified Professional Estimator (CPE) designation to interested applicants.

Helpful Skills

Prospective project estimators must be adept in mathematics. They should also have keen analytical skills. These professionals must be able to manage the high stress of tight deadlines and the major responsibility of accurately forecasting the budget for a project.

To recap, prospective project estimators should first earn a bachelor’s degree related to construction management or mathematics, depending on the industry in which they would like to work. Certifications exist as well, which prove the competencies gained from a combination of formal education and work experience. Once established, project estimators are responsible for assessing a building site or manufacturing process to determine the cost of development.

Top Insurance Resume Samples & Pro Writing Tips

A well-written resume serves as one of the best job-search tools you can have. This document goes over your biggest accomplishments, skills, and experiences. If your resume provides the right information, you may have an easier time getting interviews and impressing hiring managers. As someone in the insurance industry, you need to better understand what employers want to see from their workers.

You can gather industry-specific information by looking over our insurance resume samples. These examples show you how to point out your skills. Some even showcase how people in different parts of their careers can focus on their strengths. Industry-specific examples often serve as your best guideline for crafting your own document. As you look at the samples, find out who might best use each one to see which format is really right for you.

Insurance Resume Samples

Your claims adjuster resume has to show how well you can help insurance agencies. This means going over your ability to investigate claims, interview claimants, work with other professionals, and make tough decisions. Find out how other candidates point out their top skills and accomplishments by reviewing our insurance resume samples. Then, use what you learn to craft your own outstanding document.

  • For:
  • Highly-motivated workers who are willing to travel and familiar with interviewing and investigation techniques.
  • Insurance Skills To Include:
  • Detail oriented and meticulous
  • Strong verbal and written communication
  • Able to empathize, yet maintain company policies
  • Good analytical and decision-making skills
  • Comfortable with numbers and math

More Information: As you set out to write your own document, it may be helpful to review our claims adjuster resume sample to get more information.

Are you a claims adjuster who specializes in automotive damage? Employers may expect you to have a familiarity with vehicles on top of your other important skills. Putting a special emphasis on your automotive-related training and abilities may help hiring managers see you as a top candidate. Look at our insurance resume samples to see how some applicants choose to format their documents.

  • For:
  • Experienced claims adjusters with a specialized knowledge of automotive damage.
  • Insurance Skills To Include:
  • Post Secondary award in auto body repair or experience at repair shop
  • Technical knowledge of vehicles and estimating repair costs
  • Strong analytical and investigative skills
  • Good communication and listening skills
  • Ability to build trust through interpersonal interactions

More Information: Get a better idea of the format to use and skills to include by reviewing our auto insurance claims adjuster resume sample through every step of your writing process.

Insurance companies trust their agents to act as the face of the company. Customers come to you to learn about insurance policies and buy new policies. Because your role is so important in the company, you need to show employers you have the integrity, salesmanship, and interpersonal skills necessary to educate and impress new and old customers.

  • For:
  • Skilled insurance agents looking to use policy knowledge to create meaningful relationships with people and businesses.
  • Insurance Skills To Include:
  • Familiarity with a variety of insurance policies and coverages
  • Go-getter attitude and great initiative
  • Strong communication and negotiation skills
  • Ability to evaluate the needs of customers
  • Confident and personable attitude

More Information: Learn more about how to impress hiring managers through your insurance resume by looking over our insurance agent resume sample.

If you want to land a job as an underwriter, you have to be ready to wow hiring managers from the moment your resume crosses their desk. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, underwriter positions may become less available over the next decade, which means you could have a lot of competition. Thankfully, we have a variety of competitive insurance resume samples you can use to learn how to catch the eye of employers.

  • For:
  • Knowledgeable, experienced underwriter looking to make a positive impact on an insurance company.
  • Insurance Skills To Include:
  • Bachelor in Finance or related subject
  • Completion of certifications or training programs
  • Strong analytical and decision-making skills
  • Great written and verbal communication
  • Team-oriented with ability to build strong relationships

More Information: Get more information about what employers want to see on this type of document by looking at our underwriter resume sample.

As an insurance account manager, you promote your agency’s products to brokers and advisers who will sell them. If you want to land a new job in this position, you need to show employers you have the sales and business acumen needed to succeed. Unlike other insurance positions, you may end up dealing with companies more than customers.

  • For:
  • Experienced insurance specialist ready to promote products to other advisers and brokers to help them make sales.
  • Insurance Skills To Include:
  • Master in Business Administration, Finance, or similar field
  • Strong verbal and written communication
  • Great organization and eye for detail
  • Able to analyze situations
  • Technical knowledge of insurance policies and coverages

More Information: If you want to start writing your own document, take a moment to look over our insurance account manager resume sample.

Popular Insurance Resume Questions

Looking at a generic list of insurance-related skills might not help you as much as you think. Employers want to see specific abilities that might not correlate to industry skills. Rather than creating a general document, you should tailor your resume to the position you want to get. Read through the job description to get an idea of the skills recruiters want to see. Check out our insurance resume samples to see which skills get used most often. Many employers seek candidates with strong communication, organization, and interpersonal abilities.

2. What is the best design for an insurance resume?

Insurance resumes need to be easy to read. The design you use should focus on readability rather than flash. Try to incorporate short paragraphs, bullet points, and headers to make your document pleasing to the eye. Most resumes for jobs in this industry use traditional and simple design techniques to impress hiring managers with the content. Find out which designs are most popular by looking over the insurance resume samples.

3. What’s the best format for a resume: PDF, MS Word, or .txt?

Chances are, you will have to send your resume electronically to a few employers. How should you send it? Because you want your document to be easy to read, you need to use a format that keeps the design of your document intact. You probably won’t want to use a .txt format, because this takes away important design elements, such as headers and bullet points.

A PDF can help make your document look nice, but this isn’t always the best solution either. Many employers use an Applicant Tracking System to help them find candidates who meet their qualifications requirements. PDFs may not translate well into this system, which could mean you don’t get an interview.

MS Word often lands on top of the best format list because it maintains an easy-to-read document and works well with ATS. If you have to send an electronic resume, you may want to use MS Word.

4. How do I list references on an insurance resume?

Most employers don’t expect to see a reference list on your resume, which is why most of the insurance resume samples don’t have one. This means you don’t have to include a list unless a hiring manager specifically requests it. When recruiters do want it, include the reference list at the end of your document under a special header. Use a bulleted list to include the name, relationship, and contact information of each of your references.

5. How do I write a summary statement for an insurance resume?

Summary statements serve an important purpose. They come at the top of your resume and give a brief overview of your most important skills, experiences, and accomplishments. By reading this section, employers may be able to figure out what sort of value you could add to their company.

As you set out to write your own statement, try to include skills and characteristics that are important to the industry, like communication abilities, initiative, and technical knowledge about policies. You can also mention your years of experience. While you may have a lot you want to say, try to keep this section to three sentences in either a paragraph or list format.

How to write an Insurance Resume

Contact Details

Next it is important to include an objective for insurance resumes for more junior candidates. An objective is one sentence that explains your goal of your resume. It should be targeted for the specific job to which you are applying. This insurance resume sample recommends something like this:

Detail oriented insurance analyst with strong analytical and mathematical skills looking for second job in the insurance industry with a respected player.

Experienced insurance candidates should put in a profile at the top of their insurance resume instead of an objective. A profile is four short sentences giving an overview of the most significant skills and experience of the candidate to date, pertaining to the job application at hand. Sample insurance resumes include profiles such as:

Versatile insurance industry professional with ten years experience managing insurance teams in complex business environments. Analytically-minded insurance analyst with superb organizational skills and attention to detail. Excellent insurance agency manager who is able to ensure that insurance customers are retained. Team leader with experience managing large teams to deliver projects on time and to budget.

The profile will command the initial attention of the recruiter as it sits in that critical part of the page where the attention is first drawn. It is useful to use this area to include keywords. This sample insurance resume also shows how keywords may be cleverly worked into the profile to help the resume having a greater chance of showing up when the employer does online searches for candidates. Here keyword examples used “insurance agency manager” or “insurance analyst” or “team leader”. Keywords included should be based on the job advertisement for the position to which you are applying. More information is available on keywords below.

Key Skills

Insurance Education

Insurance Work Experience

Activities

Your insurance resume needs to work in the keywords and phrases that recruiters will type into search engines while hunting for outstanding candidates for their open insurance positions. A good sample insurance resume will include a variety of relevant keywords and phrases, which may include words such as sales, analyst, analysis, claims, manager, agency or others, depending on the job advertisement and the required skills.

The above provides a summary of how sample insurance resumes are structured and the sorts of information to include for the best chances of success. For those still at school, your university may also be able to provide you with sample insurance resumes to consider, which may have some other great ideas. From this page you can find resume writing advice to get you started.

Insurance Resume Samples

Professional Resume Builder

Our team of career development experts, certified resume writers, recruitment specialists, and a wide range of passionate professionals, are all laser-focused on helping you get hired. We are proud to share with you our Free Resume Builder software equipped with HR-proven resume samples, job description bullet point phrases to choose from, easy export options, and much more!

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