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Car Insurance Florida Law

Florida No-Fault Car Insurance Rules and Coverage Requirements

Florida is a “no-fault” car insurance state when it comes to injury claims after a car accident. Here’s what drivers and passengers need to know.

In this article, we focus on Florida’s auto insurance laws and coverage requirements, including minimum requirements for all four-wheeled vehicles registered in the state, and how Florida’s status as a “no-fault” state affects injured drivers and passengers after a car accident. (If you’re new to no-fault car insurance, we provide background information in our article No-Fault Car Insurance and State Laws: The Basics. And for more details on Florida laws that could affect a car accident insurance claim or lawsuit, see our companion article Car Accident Laws in Florida.)

Florida is a “No-Fault” Car Insurance State

Florida follows a “no-fault” system when it comes to injury claims after a car accident. Drivers are required to carry auto insurance that pays personal injury protection (PIP) benefits. When the policyholder (or anyone else covered under the terms of the policy) is injured in a car accident, PIP pays medical expenses and certain non-medical-related costs associated with the accident — like lost wages and the costs of hiring someone to do household chores (known as “replacement benefits”) — up to the coverage limits.

By contrast, in an “at-fault” insurance state (also known as a “fault” or “tort liability” state), drivers may choose whether to file claims with their own insurers, file claims with another driver’s insurer, or take the other driver to court to prove he or she was the one at fault, and therefore the one responsible for paying the costs of the accident.

Who is Covered Under PIP Car Insurance in Florida?

All Florida vehicle owners are required to carry minimum PIP benefits in their policies. These benefits kick in regardless of who was at fault in the accident. But PIP protections benefit more than just the policyholder who is injured while involved in an accident in his or her own vehicle. According to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles, PIP coverage also applies to:

  • your children (not just for accidents that occur in your car, but also for injuries that occur while riding on a school bus)
  • members of your household, and
  • most passengers who lack PIP Insurance (as long as they don’t own a vehicle).

Your PIP coverage also protects you while you’re a passenger in someone else’s vehicle, and as a pedestrian or bicyclist if you suffer injuries in a crash involving a motor vehicle.

Note that anyone who is riding in your car who carries PIP will receive coverage under their own PIP for their injuries. The same goes for most licensed drivers who are driving your vehicle with your permission.

Florida’s “Injury Threshold” for Taking a Claim Out of the No-Fault System

Florida drivers can only step outside of the state’s no-fault system and pursue a claim against the at-fault driver directly:

  • if injuries resulting from the accident are considered “permanent”
  • if significant and permanent scarring or disfigurement occurs, or
  • if significant and permanent loss of an important bodily function results from the crash.

This threshold is significant because an injured driver or passenger can’t receive certain kinds of compensation via a no-fault or PIP claim. Most notably, non-economic damages like pain and suffering are excluded from the no-fault/PIP process. But once you’re permitted to step outside of the no-fault construct and file a liability claim or lawsuit, you’re entitled to seek the full spectrum of car accident damages, including payment for pain and suffering, which can really boost the value of a car accident claim.

Finally, it’s important to note that vehicle damage is never part of a no-fault or PIP claim. If you want to get payment for damage to a vehicle after an accident, you’re free to pursue an insurance action or lawsuit against the at-fault driver.

Auto Insurance Requirements in Florida

Now that you understand how no-fault PIP coverage works, what kinds and amounts of car insurance coverage are mandated under Florida law? The following minimums are required in order to register a vehicle in the state:

  • $10,000 in no-fault personal injury protection (PIP) benefits, and
  • $10,000 in property damage liability (PDL) benefits (which kicks in if you cause damage to someone else’s vehicle or other property in an accident).

Florida Car Insurance – Florida Permit Test

In Florida you are required to have Car Insurance

Florida law requires that car owners have car insurance to cover the costs of an accident.

If you own or are in charge of operating a vehicle in Florida you must have both Personal Injury Protection (PIP) and Property Damage Liability (PDL) insurance coverage of at least $10,000 each.

Review the guides below about Florida Car Insurance Laws and watch the videos. Then we recommend you take the practice test on Car Insurance to determine if you understand the topic.

Car Insurance Topics

Florida No Fault Insurance Law

You must maintain both Personal Injury Protection (PIP) and Property Damage Liability (PDL) insurance coverage of at least $10,000 each at all times.

No Car Insurance Penalties

If you are stopped by law enforcement in Florida and do not have car insurance you will have to go to court.

Car Insurance Videos

Florida No Fault Insurance Law requires you to have both Personal Injury Protection (PIP) and Property Damage Liability (PDL) insurance.

In Florida you cannot have a car without insurance. You are required to maintain insurance at all times and provide proof of insurance to law enforcement if asked.

Florida No Fault Car Insurance Law

The Florida No Fault Insurance Law requires you to have both Personal Injury Protection (PIP) and Property Damage Liability (PDL) insurance.

PIP – Personal Injury Protection

Covers the cost of your injuries regardless of who is at fault for the accident.

PDL – Property Damage Liability

Pays for damages to other peoples property that you caused.

Each type of protection (PIP and PDL) must be a minimum of $10,000 of coverage.

To register a vehicle in Florida you must provide proof of both PIP and PDL insurance.

You must always have proof of your insurance in your vehicle and provide it to law enforcement if asked.

Florida Financial Responsibility Law
If any of the following occur the Florida Financial Responsibility Law requires the addition of “Bodily Injury Liability” and increased PDL (Property Damage Liability) coverage.

  • You’re in a crash where you’re at fault and an injury has occurred.
  • Your license is suspended for too many points.
  • You are convicted of a DUI.

This additional car insurance coverage is in addition to the Florida No-Fault PIP and PDL insurance coverage.

No Car Insurance Penalties

In Florida you cannot have a car without insurance. You are required to maintain insurance at all times.

If you don’t have proof of insurance and are stopped by law enforcement you will have to go to court and prove you had insurance coverage at the time you were stopped.

Suspended License

If you did not have insurance or cannot prove it then a judge can convict you of driving without insurance and your drivers license and license plate will be suspended.

Fines for No Car Insurance

To get your drivers license and license plate reinstated you will have to get insurance and pay a reinstatement fee ranging from $150 to $500.

Florida Car Insurance Regulations

Each state mandates its own car insurance regulations or laws. Florida is no different. Florida’s laws require everyone who drives a vehicle, whether they own it or not, to maintain Florida car insurance with certain coverage and limits.

Looking for car insurance? Get FREE quotes now by entering your ZIP code in the tool box at the top of this page!

Keep reading for information on Florida car insurance regulations and what you need to know as a driver in Florida.

You’ll Need to Purchase Florida Coverage

Florida coverage is mandated for any individuals driving for a total of at least ninety days in the state of Florida. This must be insurance provided by an agency authorized to underwrite insurance in the state of Florida.

The following circumstances all require continued Florida insurance coverage:

  • If you no longer live in the state of Florida but maintain a vehicle with Florida plates and registration, you are required to continue Florida coverage on the vehicle. This also applies to individuals who leave their vehicle in Florida and live elsewhere for part of the year.
  • If the vehicle no longer runs, but you plan on keeping the vehicle, you must continue coverage on the vehicle.
  • If you do not own a vehicle but are employed as a driver, you must still obtain Florida coverage. The law requires the driver to carry bodily injury liability coverage for $125,000 for each person and $250,000 for each occurrence. In addition to bodily injury liability, the driver is also required to carry $50,000 in property damage liability.

The state of Florida can mandate that you obtain additional insurance like bodily injury liability if you have been in an excessive amount of accidents or have been convicted of certain offenses.

Florida’s No-Fault Law

Florida is considered to be a no-fault state. This simply means that your insurance company will pay your expenses whether an accident was your fault or not.

The Minimum Required Coverage in Florida

Florida requires all drivers to maintain $10,000 of personal injury protection and $10,000 of property damage liability.

Personal injury protection covers you against injuries incurred with a motor vehicle, while property damage liability covers damages to the vehicle involved in the accident.

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Uninsured Motorist and Underinsured Motorist Coverage Is Not a Requirement

The state of Florida does not require drivers to carry uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage. However, the state of Florida does require insurance agencies to offer the coverage.

If you choose against adding uninsured or underinsured coverage to your policy, the insurance company is required to send documentation of refusal to the Florida Department of Insurance.

The Insurance Requirements on Leased Vehicles

The state of Florida requires additional coverage on leased vehicles.

If you are leasing a vehicle, you must obtain one of the following types of coverage: bodily injury liability of $100,000 per person and $300,000 per accident, and $50,000 of property damage liability.

The second option is a combined amount of coverage for bodily injury liability and property damage liability for $500,000.

Rental Car Insurance Is Required

Florida law requires that an individual renting a car must acquire rental car insurance. If your policy or credit card company does not offer a rental car insurance rider, you must obtain insurance through the rental car company.

Proof of rental car insurance, whether it is administered by the rental car company, your credit card company, or your personal insurance carrier, must be accessible at all times.

The reason the policy must be handy is for your protection should you get in an accident or be pulled over by law enforcement.

What Happens If You Fail to Maintain Car Insurance

Should you fail to maintain or obtain Florida coverage, your license and registration can be suspended for up to three years. You may also be issued a ticket violation and be summoned to court.

In addition to these fees, you must pay to have your license reinstated, which could cost you up to $500.

Temporary or hardship licenses are not issued in the case of losing your license because you failed to maintain Florida coverage. Your license will continue to be suspended until proof of insurance is provided. Then the license may be reinstated.

If you choose not to insure your vehicle, the best thing to do is turn in your tag and registration to a Florida tax collector’s office or Florida driver’s license office.

Out-of-State Coverage

Once you move out of Florida you can purchase insurance in your new state. However, you should not cancel your Florida coverage until the new policy has gone into effect.

Florida is very serious about its car insurance regulations. Don’t be caught without automobile insurance.

Compare car insurance rates now by typing your ZIP code into the FREE rate tool at the bottom of the page!

Florida Car Insurance Regulations

Each state mandates its own car insurance regulations or laws. Florida is no different. Florida’s laws require everyone who drives a vehicle, whether they own it or not, to maintain Florida car insurance with certain coverage and limits.

Looking for car insurance? Get FREE quotes now by entering your ZIP code in the tool box at the top of this page!

Keep reading for information on Florida car insurance regulations and what you need to know as a driver in Florida.

You’ll Need to Purchase Florida Coverage

Florida coverage is mandated for any individuals driving for a total of at least ninety days in the state of Florida. This must be insurance provided by an agency authorized to underwrite insurance in the state of Florida.

The following circumstances all require continued Florida insurance coverage:

  • If you no longer live in the state of Florida but maintain a vehicle with Florida plates and registration, you are required to continue Florida coverage on the vehicle. This also applies to individuals who leave their vehicle in Florida and live elsewhere for part of the year.
  • If the vehicle no longer runs, but you plan on keeping the vehicle, you must continue coverage on the vehicle.
  • If you do not own a vehicle but are employed as a driver, you must still obtain Florida coverage. The law requires the driver to carry bodily injury liability coverage for $125,000 for each person and $250,000 for each occurrence. In addition to bodily injury liability, the driver is also required to carry $50,000 in property damage liability.

The state of Florida can mandate that you obtain additional insurance like bodily injury liability if you have been in an excessive amount of accidents or have been convicted of certain offenses.

Florida’s No-Fault Law

Florida is considered to be a no-fault state. This simply means that your insurance company will pay your expenses whether an accident was your fault or not.

The Minimum Required Coverage in Florida

Florida requires all drivers to maintain $10,000 of personal injury protection and $10,000 of property damage liability.

Personal injury protection covers you against injuries incurred with a motor vehicle, while property damage liability covers damages to the vehicle involved in the accident.

Free Car Insurance Comparison

Compare Quotes From Top Companies and Save

Uninsured Motorist and Underinsured Motorist Coverage Is Not a Requirement

The state of Florida does not require drivers to carry uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage. However, the state of Florida does require insurance agencies to offer the coverage.

If you choose against adding uninsured or underinsured coverage to your policy, the insurance company is required to send documentation of refusal to the Florida Department of Insurance.

The Insurance Requirements on Leased Vehicles

The state of Florida requires additional coverage on leased vehicles.

If you are leasing a vehicle, you must obtain one of the following types of coverage: bodily injury liability of $100,000 per person and $300,000 per accident, and $50,000 of property damage liability.

The second option is a combined amount of coverage for bodily injury liability and property damage liability for $500,000.

Rental Car Insurance Is Required

Florida law requires that an individual renting a car must acquire rental car insurance. If your policy or credit card company does not offer a rental car insurance rider, you must obtain insurance through the rental car company.

Proof of rental car insurance, whether it is administered by the rental car company, your credit card company, or your personal insurance carrier, must be accessible at all times.

The reason the policy must be handy is for your protection should you get in an accident or be pulled over by law enforcement.

What Happens If You Fail to Maintain Car Insurance

Should you fail to maintain or obtain Florida coverage, your license and registration can be suspended for up to three years. You may also be issued a ticket violation and be summoned to court.

In addition to these fees, you must pay to have your license reinstated, which could cost you up to $500.

Temporary or hardship licenses are not issued in the case of losing your license because you failed to maintain Florida coverage. Your license will continue to be suspended until proof of insurance is provided. Then the license may be reinstated.

If you choose not to insure your vehicle, the best thing to do is turn in your tag and registration to a Florida tax collector’s office or Florida driver’s license office.

Out-of-State Coverage

Once you move out of Florida you can purchase insurance in your new state. However, you should not cancel your Florida coverage until the new policy has gone into effect.

Florida is very serious about its car insurance regulations. Don’t be caught without automobile insurance.

Compare car insurance rates now by typing your ZIP code into the FREE rate tool at the bottom of the page!

Florida Car Insurance

Florida auto insurance has some unique qualities compared with insurance in other states, and we’ll help you understand it all. Here we provide Florida auto insurance requirements, our recommendations for the coverage you should buy, and insurance laws that are specific to Florida. Also, you can see average car insurance rates for nearly every ZIP code in Florida to help inform you as you shop for auto insurance in the Sunshine State.

The average car insurance rate in Florida is $1,823 a year. Car insurance companies use different formulas and weigh risks differently for each driver. This means rates can vary significantly by insurer, which is why you should compare rates. For example, in Coral Gables ZIP code 33135, the highest rate among six carriers is $5,710. That’s over $4,000 more than the lowest ($1,500).

Cheap car insurance in Florida

Florida car insurance requirements

Florida laws mandate that drivers carry $10,000 of personal injury protection (PIP). It covers you, your passengers and other authorized drivers of your car who are injured while in your insured vehicle. You also must have $10,000 of property damage liability to pay for damage to others’ cars.

You certainly can drive with just the minimum coverage mandated by the state. But we strongly recommend that you also purchase bodily injury liability coverage. This pays, up to your policy limits, for injuries others receive in an accident caused by you or other drivers listed on your policy. While not required by the state, many car insurance companies require it as part of any policy they issue in Florida. Here’s why: Florida is a no-fault state. Treatment for any injuries you suffer is covered by your personal injury protection, up to its limit. This is regardless of who caused the accident. If bills exceed that limit, the at-fault driver is legally personally responsible unless he or she has bought bodily injury liability coverage.

If you buy bodily injury liability coverage, the smallest amount you can buy is $10,000 per person (up to $20,000 per accident). Homeowners and those with substantial assets need more than that.

Buying the recommended liability coverage with comprehensive insurance and collision coverage will cost more, but generally won’t break the bank. Increasing your insurance from the state minimum to full coverage with a $500 deductible costs, on average, $939 more, or $78 a month.

**The table shows the average annual rate of nearly every ZIP code in Florida from up to six major insurance companies. Rates are for a male driver, age 40, with a clean record and good credit for a 2016 Honda Accord. Data was provided for CarInsurance.com by Quadrant Information Services.

Recommended car insurance coverage

The best car insurance coverage may not be the cheapest, so how much insurance should you buy? Bare-bones coverage may be a good choice if you have few assets or have an old car and don’t drive much. But if you have a home and investments, consider buying more insurance. If you don’t, you’re at risk for having your money and house taken to cover the cost of an accident. If you financed your car you will be required to get additional comprehensive and collision coverage.

Use our How Much Car Insurance Do You Need? tool to get a recommendation.

We recommend you buy more insurance than is required to legally drive a car in your state, especially if you have savings and assets. The more money you have, the more likely you are to be sued following a car accident should your insurance be insufficient to cover all the expenses. If your net worth is:

  • less than $50,000, choose at least 50/100/50
  • between $50,000 and $100,000, choose at least 100/300/100
  • more than $100,000, choose at least 250/500/100

If you’re leasing or financing your car, you must get coverage of 100/300/100 or higher.

Collision and comprehensive

Collision coverage pays for damage to your car after an accident that you cause. Comprehensive insurance pays to replace stolen cars and for damages from vandalism, flooding, hail, fire and animal strikes. These are optional, and, typically affordable to add to a policy. The average annual rate for collision for Florida drivers is $242, comprehensive is $107, according to the Insurance Information Institute. If your car is:

  • less than 10 years old, you should strongly consider buying collision and comprehensive.
  • more than 10 years old, only buy collision and comprehensive if your car is worth $3,000 or more, if you couldn’t afford to replace your car if it’s wrecked, or if you just want more protection on your policy.

If you buy comp and collision, check our guide to choosing a deductible amount.

Uninsured/underinsured motorist

These are both optional coverages and should match the liability limits you choose. Uninsured motorist coverage and underinsured motorist coverage pays for damages if you’re hit by a driver with no insurance or a driver with coverage that’s insufficient to pay for your repairs and medical expenses.

Medical coverage (MedPay)

Medical payments coverage can help pay for the medical or funeral expenses of covered drivers and passengers after an accident, regardless of fault, up to $25,000. In most states, including Florida, it’s an optional addition to your car insurance policy. Because Florida requires you to carry PIP, you likely don’t need MedPay coverage. That’s because PIP provides coverage equal to and beyond MedPay. However, one benefit of MedPay is that there’s no deductible. Another is that it covers passengers in your car who have no health insurance. Finally, Florida PIP pays only 80 percent of your medical expenses, so MedPay would cover the remaining 20 percent of costs for your injuries. MedPay does the following:

  • Covers you and your passengers’ medical expenses
  • Pays for expenses after health insurance limits are exceeded
  • Offers additional protection to insured drivers who are hit by a car while walking or biking

If you and your passengers:

  • Don’t have health insurance, or have a plan that doesn’t cover car accidents or has low limits, we recommend that you add medical coverage of at least $5,000 to your car insurance policy.
  • Do have health insurance, it’s still a good idea to have medical coverage if you want the best protection in your policy, as it can pay out after your health benefits are maxed out. It is especially a good idea if your health plan has high deductibles you must pay before treatment is covered.

Gap insurance

If you don’t own your car outright and have an accident, gap insurance pays the difference between the cash value of your car and the current outstanding balance on your loan or lease.

  • If you’re financing your car, your car is less than one year old and you’ve put less than 20 percent down on it, you should buy gap insurance. If not, you don’t need gap insurance.
  • If you’re leasing your car, it’s a good idea to buy gap insurance if you aren’t already required to in your lease agreement.
  • If you own your car outright, you don’t need gap insurance.

Florida car insurance rates by company

Below you’ll see average annual rates for Florida, ranked cheapest to most expensive, for three coverage levels:

  • State minimum liability requirements
  • Liability limits of $50,000 per person/$100,000 per accident and $50,000 property damage
  • Liability of $100,000 per person/$300,000 per accident and $100,000 property damage, with comprehensive and collision at $500 deductible

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